Graduated from arts and craft university of Armenia, Garo is the Artisan by definition. With no fear Garo embraced the artisanal work of stone carver and expended his skills in woodwork. Meticulous, patient, passionate, and a perfect handyman, Garo translates the concepts of Momig

into reality.

An architect and a product designer, Ani is always looking at combining practicality and aesthetics, and allowing simplicity to impose itself on

all designs. Based in New York, Ani is working in a boutique architectural firm while doing her master in Integrated Design & Management at MIT.

ANI

SAHAKYAN

An architect by education, Roupen joined UN and worked in 12 countries. Fascinated by the Armenian heritage of fine design, he took a break from the humanitarian work and spent half a year learning the basics of stone carving on Aram street in Yerevan. He always says: You think you are shaping the stone, but in reality the stone is shaping you.

ROUPEN

ALEXANDRIAN

Graduated from arts and craft university of Armenia, Garo is the Artisan by definition. With no fear Garo embraced the artisanal work of stone carver and expended his skills in woodwork. Meticulous, patient, passionate, and a perfect handyman, Garo translates the concepts of Momig Design

into reality.

KARO

SARGSYAN

The three eras that influence and shape Momig Design designs are The Neolithic rock-art, the Vishapakars and the Khatchkars.

 

According to Tokhatyan- a researcher at the Institute of History of National Academy of Science of Armenia- the rock-art in Armenia (the closest “ancestor” of stone carving) began in the Neolithic period, reaching its peak during the Bronze Age. These carving on rock fragments depict hunting scenes, a wide array of animals, spirals, circles, geometric shapes, and even zodiac signs.

 

During the Bronze Age, the Vishapakars- menhirs that date back to 2,000BC - are of significant importance. The Vishapakar (dragon stone) are believed to have religious significance, often related with water, rain and a rich giving soul, and whose tail is capable of creating canals and paths when it hits the Earth.

 

During this period several states flourished in the area of Greater Armenia, with a set of beliefs that led to the emergence of Zoroatrianism, and the design of temples, which have also influenced Momig Design.

 

Fast forward to the Christian era. Christianity spread into the country as early as 40AD. The first khatchkars- cross stones- appeared in the 9th century. The peak of the khatchkar carving art was between the 12th and the 14th centuries. It’s during this period that Momik- an Armenian architect, sculptor, and a master stone carver, designed, built and carved his masterpieces. Our name is inspired by him.

 

Since Momik times, the fundamental techniques of this art have not changed.

A hammer, a chisel and the patience of the artist is the magic formula.

We would like to use this opportunity to thank three great friends:

 

Talking about Armenian ornaments without referring to Armen Kyurkchyan and Hrair Hawk Khatcherian’s Armenian Ornamental Art book would be unfair. Thank to these two authors, Momig Design was able to understand the high aesthetic tastes, the deep sense of beauty and the interminable vitality of Armenian medieval culture.

 

We would like to pay tribute to Shant Hagopian, who left us for personal reasons, but was part of our team at the initial stage of Momig Design.

 

It is worth noting as well that Momig Design would not have existed without the guidance of master stone carver, Varastad Hampartsoumyan. If you have a chance, please do visit  the master’s workshop on Aram street in Yerevan.

Copyright 2019 Momig Design. All rights reserved.

designed by BRANDIT.

An architect and a product designer, Ani is always looking at combining practicality and aesthetics, and allowing simplicity to impose itself on all designs. Based in New York, Ani is working in a boutique architectural firm while doing her master in Integrated Design & Management at MIT.

ANI

SAHAKYAN

An architect by education, Roupen joined UN and worked in 12 countries. Fascinated by the Armenian heritage of fine design, he took a break from the humanitarian work and spent half a year learning the basics of stone carving on Aram street in Yerevan. He always says: You think you are shaping the stone, but in reality the stone is shaping you.

ROUPEN

ALEXANDRIAN

Graduated from arts and craft university of Armenia, Garo is the Artisan by deifinition. With no fear Garo embraced the artisinal work of stone carver and expended his skills in woodwork.

Meticulous, patient, passionate, and a perfect handyman, Garo translates the concepts of Momig Design into reality.

KARO

SARGSYAN

The three eras that influence and shape Momig Design designs are The Neolithic rock-art, the Vishapakars and the Khatchkars.

 

According to Tokhatyan- a researcher at the Institute of History of National Academy of Science of Armenia- the rock-art in Armenia (the closest “ancestor” of stone carving) began in the Neolithic period, reaching its peak during the Bronze Age. These carving on rock fragments depict hunting scenes, a wide array of animals, spirals, circles, geometric shapes, and even zodiac signs.

 

During the Bronze Age, the Vishapakars- menhirs that date back to 2,000BC - are of significant importance. The Vishapakar (dragon stone) are believed to have religious significance, often related with water, rain and a rich giving soul, and whose tail is capable of creating canals and paths when it hits the Earth.

 

During this period several states flourished in the area of Greater Armenia, with a set of beliefs that led to the emergence of Zoroatrianism, and the design of temples, which have also influenced Momig Design.

 

Fast forward to the Christian era. Christianity spread into the country as early as 40AD. The first khatchkars- cross stones- appeared in the 9th century. The peak of the khatchkar carving art was between the 12th and the 14th centuries. It’s during this period that Momik- an Armenian architect, sculptor, and a master stone carver, designed, built and carved his masterpieces. Our name is inspired by him.

 

Since Momik times, the fundamental techniques of this art have not changed.

A hammer, a chisel and the patience of the artist is the magic formula.

We would like to use this opportunity to thank three great friends:

 

Talking about Armenian ornaments without referring to Armen Kyurkchyan and Hrair Hawk Khatcherian’s Armenian Ornemental Art book would be unfair. Thank to these two authors, Momig Design was able to understand the high aesthetic tastes, the deep sense of beauty and the interminable vitality of Armenian medieval culture.

 

We would like to pay tribute to Shant Hagopian, who left us for personal reasons, but was part of our team at the initial stage of Momig Design.

 

It is worth noting as well that Momig Design would not have existed without the guidance of master stone carver, Varastad Hampartsoumyan. If you have a chance, please do visit  the master’s workshop on Aram street in Yerevan.

ANI

SAHAKYAN

An architect by education, Roupen joined UN and worked in 12 countries. Fascinated by the Armenian heritage of fine design, he took a break from the humanitarian work and spent half a year learning the basics of stone carving on Aram street in Yerevan. He always says: You think you are shaping the stone, but in reality the stone is shaping you.

KARO

SARGSYAN

An architect and a product designer, Ani is always looking at combining practicality and aesthetics, and allowing simplicity to impose itself on all designs. Based in New York, Ani is working in a boutique architectural firm while doing her master in Integrated Design & Management at MIT.

ROUPEN

ALEXANDRIAN

Graduated from arts and craft university of Armenia, Garo is the Artisan by definition. With no fear Garo embraced the artisanal work of stone carver and expended his skills in woodwork. Meticulous, patient, passionate, and a perfect handyman, Garo translates the concepts of Momig Design into reality.

The three eras that influence and shape Momig Design designs are The Neolithic rock-art, the Vishapakars and the Khatchkars.

 

According to Tokhatyan- a researcher at the Institute of History of National Academy of Science of Armenia- the rock-art in Armenia (the closest “ancestor” of stone carving) began in the Neolithic period, reaching its peak during the Bronze Age. These carving on rock fragments depict hunting scenes, a wide array of animals, spirals, circles, geometric shapes, and even zodiac signs.

 

During the Bronze Age, the Vishapakars- menhirs that date back to 2,000BC - are of significant importance. The Vishapakar (dragon stone) are believed to have religious significance, often related with water, rain and a rich giving soul, and whose tail is capable of creating canals and paths when it hits the Earth.

 

Fast forward to the Christian era. Christianity spread into the country as early as 40AD. The first khatchkars- cross stones- appeared in the 9th century. The peak of the khatchkar carving art was between the 12th and the 14th centuries. It’s during this period that Momik- an Armenian architect, sculptor, and a master stone carver, designed, built and carved his masterpieces. Our name is inspired by him.

 

Since Momik times, the fundamental techniques of this art have not changed.

A hammer, a chisel and the patience of the artist is the magic formula.

An architect and a product designer, Ani is always looking at combining practicality and aesthetics, and allowing simplicity to impose itself on all designs. Based in New York, Ani is working in a boutique architectural firm while doing her master in Integrated Design

& Management at MIT.

An architect by education, Roupen joined UN and worked in 12 countries. Fascinated by the Armenian heritage of fine design, he took a break from the humanitarian work and spent half a year learning the basics of stone carving on Aram street in Yerevan. He always says: You think you are shaping the stone, but in reality the stone is shaping you.

Graduated from arts and craft university of Armenia, Garo is the Artisan by definition. With no fear Garo embraced the artisanal work of stone carver and expended his skills in woodwork. Meticulous, patient, passionate, and a perfect handyman, Garo translates the concepts of Momig Design into reality.

The three eras that influence and shape Momig Design designs are The Neolithic rock-art, the Vishapakars and the Khatchkars.

 

According to Tokhatyan- a researcher at the Institute of History of National Academy of Science of Armenia- the rock-art in Armenia began in the Neolithic period, reaching its peak during the Bronze Age.

 

During the Bronze Age, the Vishapakars- menhirs that date back to 2,000BC - are of significant importance. The Vishapakar (dragon stone) are believed to have religious significance, often related with water.

 

Fast forward to the Christian era. Christianity spread into the country as early as 40AD. The first khatchkars- cross stones- appeared in the 9th century. The peak of the khatchkar carving art was around 13th century. It’s during this period that Momik- an Armenian architect, sculptor, and a master stone carver, designed, built and carved his masterpieces. Our name is inspired by him.

 

Since Momik times, the fundamental techniques of this art have not changed. A hammer, a chisel and the patience of the artist is the magic formula.

We would like to use this opportunity to thank three great friends:

 

Talking about Armenian ornaments without referring to Armen Kyurkchyan and Hrair Hawk Khatcherian’s Armenian Ornamental Art book would be unfair.

 

We would like to pay tribute to Shant Hagopian, who left us for personal reasons, but was part of our team at the initial stage of Momig Design.

 

It is worth noting as well that Momig Design would not have existed without the guidance of master stone carver, Varastad Hampartsoumyan. If you have a chance, please do visit  the master’s workshop on Aram street in Yerevan.

Copyright 2019 Momig Design. All rights reserved.

designed by BRANDIT.